Lit. and a Latte

Books you'll want to devour… or not, as the case may be.

Good Reads for December

on 08/12/2012

December is a month for being with family, eating disgusting amounts of delicious food, and curling up on front of the fire with a good book and an eggnog latte. I recently joined a number of groups on Goodreads.com and tomorrow I am going to the library to pick up the books on my reading list for this month.

goodreadsFor the Books2Movies Club, which focuses on books that have been made into films, I will be reading The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. The book is made up of the diaries and letters of a depressed high-schooler. It sounds a bit like the classic Adrian Mole series I used to read, so I am rather looking forward to it. Another member of the group said that she loved the book so much she couldn’t put it down. Let’s hope I experience the same sensation!

I will be reading three very different books for The Readers Review: Literature from 1800 to 1910. The first will be Henry James‘s The Turn of the Screw which I have heard of, naturally, but am ashamed to admit I know very little about. Then in honour of the Christmas season, I will be reading Charles Dickens‘s classic short story The Cricket on the Hearth. Lastly, I will try to get my hands on a copy of A. S. Byatt‘s The Children’s BookI have never heard of this last book, but I did enjoy Possession, so I hope this one will turn out to be as good a read.

The Victorians! club has thrilled me by selecting Oscar Wilde‘s hilarious play “The Importance of Being Ernest” for its next discussion. I have read the piece before and have seen both versions of the film, both of which I enjoyed immensely.

“To lose one parent, Mr. Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.”

I will never tire of Agatha Christie mysteries, which is lucky because apparently she never tired writing them! The Agatha Christie Lovers group will be reading one I have not yet read: Murder in the Mews, a Hercule Poirot adventure.

Regretably, I did not get around to reading Travels in West Africa by Mary Henrietta Kingsley the November selection for the Women of the World (WOW) Book Club, but I do look forward to The Reeducation of Cherry Truong: A Novel by Aimee Phan.

PrintThere are also a few books that have been available to me via NetGalley that I hope to read and review in the upcoming weeks. Shakespeare on Toast is written by actor/author Ben Crystal and promises to dust the cobwebs off the tired old Bard. Eighty Days by Matthew Goodman is about two women journalists from New York who raced each other around the world, determined to give Jules Verne‘s fictional hero Phileas Fogg a run for his money. The book will be published in February, 2013 by Random House. I am also curious about the recently published book by Preethi Burkholder, 17 Women Who Shook the World, which claims to teach “the secrets for embracing highly effective lives: a 24-step program for achieving your dreams.”

This list ought to keep me occupied over the Christmas holidays. I only hope I have time to get to at least one book per group. If you have read any of the above-mentioned books, I would be interested to hear you impressions. Thanks for reading!


5 responses to “Good Reads for December

  1. Kristen says:

    Go, Margaret! That’s a hefty amount of books, but with a fire and a latte to aid you, I have no doubt you’ll read every one. I’ll be very much interested to hear how you like each one, and maybe on your recommendation I’ll follow in your footsteps with a few. Enjoy!

  2. Lindsey says:

    Added you on GoodReads! (If you see a “Lindsey D” with a somewhat blurry photo – that’s me! haha) I’ve never been terribly active in groups on there. Might have to look into it since I have three weeks off from school soon.

    • Fantastic! It can be really fun seeing what other people think about books you’e read/are reading.

      • Lindsey says:

        That’s one of the many perks of the site! I also love discovering books I may not have heard of otherwise when others read them or add them to a list.

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